It is not placed over against reason…

The testimonium (of the Holy Spirit) is not placed over against reason as a form of mysticism or subjectivism. Rather, it goes beyond and transcends reason.

R. C. Sproul, quoted in Encyclopedia of Christian Apologetics by Norman Geisler, under the topic ‘Noetic Effects of Sin’

Morals are morals, everyone has their own…

The following statements were from interviews done by Ligonier Ministries:

  • “If I don’t like it, then it’s wrong. If I like it, then it’s right. It’s as simple as that.”
  • “…from my experiences, what I can see and feel, basically just what feels right for me. There’s no particular thing that makes me say this is morally right or this is morally wrong.”
  • “The Bible doesn’t have much authority over my life, I basically go on my own, I have my own certain morals.”
  • “Whether something is right or wrong is very individual. I think that it all depends on the circumstances of your life. I decide whether something is wrong for me, if it’s not morally correct for me then I won’t do it. And if something’s good for me, if it’s going to make me happy or it’s going to get me what I want…”
  • “Morals are morals, everyone has their own.”
  • “I can say what’s true for me and I’m sure everyone can say what’s true for themselves, but I have no idea what’s true for everyone.”
  • “I think that it depends on the person that’s looking at the situation. I don’t think there’s absolute standards of right or wrong.”

R. C. Sproul, from Choosing Your Religion, message 1

For me, there is no God…

In discussing relativism, R. C. Sproul recounted the following discussion between himself and a young woman on a college campus:

Woman: Professor Sproul, you find religion meaningful…

Sproul: Yes

Woman: You pray to God…

Sproul: Yes Continue reading

A radically different view of history…

At the heart of the difference between Greek mythology and biblical literature is a radically different view of the significance of history. For the Greek there is no overt attempt to ground myth within the framework of history. Indeed, for the gods to become actually incarnate in the realm of space and time is utterly repugnant to the Greek mind. On the other hand that which is non-historical or anti-historical is relegated to the level of falsehood by the Hebrew. This radically opposing view of history is essential to understanding the Jewish-Greek antithesis with respect to the question of myth.

R. C. Sproul, from Reason to Believe, p. 22

An Apology for Apologetics…

The term apologetics has its origin in the Greek word apologia meaning “a reply.” Apologetics as a special science was born out of a combination of a divine mandate and the pressing need to respond to false charges leveled against the early church. God requires that we be prepared to give a “reason for the hope that is within us” (1 Peter 3:15).  In this regard the apologist echoes the work of the apostles who did not ask people to respond to Christ in blind faith. The apostolic testimony to Christ was buttressed both by rational argument and empirical evidence. Continue reading

Natural theology asserts that people…

Natural theology which is derived from general (natural) revelation, stands as a polar opposite to fideism in matters of philosophy and theology. Where natural theology asserts that people can and do gain valid knowledge of God by means of natural reason reflecting upon natural revelation, fideism asserts that God can be known only by faith. Fideism as an ism does not merely assert that faith is crucial to Christianity. The ism of fideism negates a knowledge of God via natural theology. It denies man’s ability to know God except by faith.

R. C. Sproul, from Classical Apologetics, p. 27

Christianity is a benefit to culture…

There is benefit to culture derived when Christianity enjoys a status of intellectual credibility. When the faith is relegated to a reservation of personal religion or piety based solely on sentiment, it has difficulty informing the institutions that shape culture. Where Christian truth is established with credibility, it has a salutary effect on culture.

R. C. Sproul, excerpt taken from Tabletalk magazine, July 1991

Meaning of the term “omnipotence”…

A point of confusion rests with the meaning of the term “omnipotence.” As a theological term the word does not mean that God can do anything. What it does mean is that God does have all power over His creatures. The whole created order is always under the control and authority of God.

R. C. Sproul, from Reason to Believe, p. 123

Understanding hypocrisy…

To preach at a higher level than you perform is not hypocrisy. To claim a higher level of performance than you have attained is hypocrisy.

R. C. Sproul, from Reason to Believe, p. 83