In this world I am a stranger…

As for myself, I can’t say, it would be impossible for me to say, that at that point I believed or that at that point I disbelieved. I just struggled along feeling from the beginning convinced of one thing, which I think perhaps is the basic nature of a religious faith, that in this world I am a stranger. I don’t belong here. I am staying here for a bit and it’s a very nice place, an interesting place, but I don’t belong here.

Malcolm Muggeridge, from The End of Christendom, p. 28

The great mercy and marvel of the Incarnation…

Thanks to the great mercy and marvel of the Incarnation, the cosmic scene is resolved into a human drama. God reaches down to relate himself to man, and man reaches up to relate himself to God. Time looks into eternity and eternity into time, making now always and always now. Everything is transformed by this sublime drama of the Incarnation, God’s special parable for fallen man in a fallen world. The way opens before us that was charted in the birth, ministry, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ, a way that successive generations of believers have striven to follow. They have derived there from the moral, spiritual, and intellectual creativity out of which has come everything truly great in our art, our literature, our music. From that source comes the splendour of the great cathedrals and the illumination of the saints and mystics, as well as countless lives of dedication, men and women serving their God and loving their Saviour in humility and faith.

Malcolm Muggeridge, from The End of Christendom, p. 51

The one thing that television can’t do…

The one thing that television can’t do is express ideas…. There is a danger in translating life into an image, and that is what television is doing. In doing it, it is falsifying life. Far from the camera’s being an accurate recorder of what is going on, it is the exact opposite. It cannot convey reality nor does it even want to.

Malcolm Muggeridge, quoted in Truth Decay by Douglas Groothuis, p. 285

The social structure is tumbling down…

Previous civilizations have been overthrown from without by the incursion of barbarian hordes. Christendom has dreamed up its own dissolution in the minds of its own intellectual elite. Our barbarians are home products, indoctrinated at the public expense, urged on by the media systematically stage by stage, dismantling Christendom, depreciating and deprecating all its values. The whole social structure is now tumbling down, dethroning its God, undermining all its certainties. All this, wonderfully enough, is being done in the name of the health, wealth, and happiness of all mankind.

Malcolm Muggeridge, from The End of Christendom, p. 17

Christendom is quite different…

Christendom, however, is something quite different from Christianity, being the administrative or power structure, based on the Christian religion and constructed by men. It bears the same relation to the everlasting truth of the Christian revelation as, say, laws do to justice, or morality to goodness, or carnality to love—if you like, as Augustine’s City of God to the earthly city where we temporarily live. Continue reading

Educated into imbecility…

We have educated ourselves into imbecility, and amused ourselves into impotence.

Malcolm Muggeridge, quoted in “The Harvard Veritas Forum Question & Answer Session 2” by Ravi Zacharias, at 28:00

The depravity of man…

The most empirically verifiable reality is the depravity of man, and yet it is also the one that is the most hotly debated.

Malcolm Muggeridge

Now we see Christendom sinking…

Now we see Christendom likewise sinking. But the true point I want to make is this: that Christ’s kingdom remains. Indeed, it can be seen more clearly and appreciated more sharply by contrast with the darkness and depravity of the contemporary scene.

Malcolm Muggeridge, from The End of Christendom, p. 37