Alternatives to the methods of popular culture…

There is a great deal of wisdom in Marshall McLuhan’s observation that “the medium is the message.” The forms of our popular culture may well have a more significant effect on our perceptions than the content. This is why I do not believe that much would be improved if, all other things being equal, Christians could somehow take over all of the instruments of popular culture, even if they were very talented and orthodox Christians.

Rather than starting our own TV networks, movie production companies, or imitations of People, we would do much better to make the church a living example of alternatives to the methods and messages of popular culture.

Kenneth Myers, from All God’s Children and Blue Suede Shoes, kindle location 205

Is something “beautiful” just because…

In an age of egalitarianism and relativism, it is easier than ever to regard matters of taste as wholly private and personal. I like Bach, you like Bon Jovi, praise the Lord anyhow. But is aesthetic judgment purely a subjective and neutral matter? Is “beauty” exclusively in the eye of the beholder? Is something “beautiful” just because I like it, or does it have some objective quality rooted in creation that allows me to recognize that it is beautiful?

Kenneth Myers, from All God’s Children and Blue Suede Shoes, kindle location 1147

One of the reasons for being literate…

One of the principle reasons for being literate is to be able to distinguish truth from falsehood. But if that distinction is regarded as less and less important in our lives, in politics, in art, in relationships, in religion, than why bother learning to read?

Kenneth Myers, from All God’s Children and Blue Suede Shoes, p. 168

What we love will ruin us…

In the introduction to his thoughtful book Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in an Age of Show Business, Neil Postman explains that the purpose of his book, published in 1985, was to reflect, not on Orwell’s chilling prophecy for the previous year, but on the slightly earlier vision of Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, whose account of dystopia is not as well-known in our day, perhaps because it is more critical of the media than of government. Continue reading