The danger of ritual…

The danger of ritual is that it easily degenerates into ritualism, that is, into a mere performance in which the ceremony has become an end in itself, a meaningless substitute for intelligent worship.

John Stott, from Your Mind Matters, p. 15

Knowledge is indispensable…

Knowledge is indispensable to Christian life and service. If we do not use the mind which God has given us, we condemn ourselves to spiritual superficiality and cut ourselves off from many of the riches of God’s grace. At the same time, knowledge is given us to be used, to lead us to higher worship, greater faith, deeper holiness, better service. What we need is not less knowledge but more knowledge, so long as we act upon it.

John Stott, from Your Mind Matters, p. 84

The lack of a Christian mind…

Harry Blamires has justly deplored the contemporary lack of a Christian mind. A “Christian mind” is described by Mr. Blamires as “a mind trained, informed, equipped to handle data of secular controversy within a framework of reference which is constructed of Christian presuppositions,” presuppositions (for example) of the supernatural, of the pervasiveness of evil, of truth, authority and the value of the human person. Continue reading

Solid content in our evangelistic…

There must be a solid content in our evangelistic proclamation of Christ. It is our responsibility to set Jesus Christ forth in the fullness of his divine-human person and saving work so that through this “preaching of Christ” (Romans 10:13-14, 17) God may arouse faith in the hearer. Such evangelistic preaching is far removed from its tragic caricature, all too common today, namely an emotional, anti-intellectual appeal for “decisions” when the hearers have but the haziest notion what they are to decide about and why.

John Stott, from Your Mind Matters, p. 66

To evangelize does not mean…

To evangelize … does not mean to win converts … but simply to announce the good news, irrespective of the results.

John Stott, quoted in Nine Marks of a Healthy Church by Mark Dever, p. 135