The world’s religions disagree about…

The world’s religions do not support the claim that there are many paths up the same mountain. The paths are utterly inimical to one another on almost every important issue. In fact, the world’s religions disagree about the existence and nature of the mountain itself and contradict one another on all of the topics of greatest importance. One simply must investigate those claims to determine which religions can withstand rigorous scrutiny of their claims. Nothing less than eternity may be at stake.

Craig Parton, from Religion on Trial, p. 94

Composed by eyewitnesses…

The bibliographical, internal and external evidence tests confirm the following: that the books of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John were composed by eyewitnesses on top of the events they record, that these works have a manuscript tradition that simply dwarfs any other works of antiquity, that they carry the evidence of internal consistency and personal attestation, and that they are supported by the soundest of external evidence from archeology.

Craig Parton, from Religion on Trial, p. 60

Funerals remind us…

Funerals remind us that the implications of our world view could not be more serious and important.

Craig Parton, from Religion on Trial, p. xv

Faith is a relational term…

“Faith” is a relational term that necessarily involves an object of belief. Christianity does not advocate faith in faith. There is no magic in believing. Believing is per se neither good nor bad. What is critical is the object of the faith.

Craig Parton, from Religion on Trial, p. 19

Are there rules historians use…

Are there rules historians use to determine the likelihood of certain things having occurred in the past? Can those be employed to determine the “historicity” of a religion and its claims?

Craig Parton, from Religion on Trial, p. 31

To even employ the word evil…

One must presuppose an absolute moral standard to even employ the word “evil” in a comprehensible fashion. However, an absolute standard of morality is impossible unless God exists. If there is no God, both good and evil are strictly relative concepts and by-products of cultural conditions and sociological-political-psychological factors. If God does not exist, there is no “problem” of evil. What is, is and no more can be said.

Craig Parton, from Religion on Trial, p. 79