No room for freedom of the will…

[We] are inclined to say that since nature consists of particles and their relations with each other, and since everything can be accounted for in terms of those particles and their relations, there is simply no room for freedom of the will…. [Quantum] indeterminism is no evidence that there is or could be some mental energy of human freedom that can move molecules in directions that they were not otherwise going to move. So it really does look as if everything we know about physics forces us to some form of denial of human freedom.

John Searle, quoted in The Recalcitrant Imago Dei by J. P. Moreland, p. 50

Free will simply does not exist…

Free will as it is traditionally conceived—the freedom to make uncoerced and unpredictable choices among alternative possible courses of action—simply does not exist…. There is no way that the evolutionary process as currently conceived can produce a being that is truly free to make choices.

William Provine, quoted in Darwin on Trial by Phillip E. Johnson, p. 127

Naturalistic evolution denies human freedom…

Since any form of naturalistic evolution denies human freedom, it must deny responsibility, and hence it cannot be that my actions have any value.

W. David Beck, from In Defense of Miracles, edited by R. Douglas Geivett and Gary R. Habermas, p. 161

Jesus commissions his followers to persuade…

One should observe that Jesus commissions his followers to persuade and influence people through teaching that is empowered by the Holy Spirit. He never authorizes imperialism, exploitation, coercion, threats, or any other means of illicit power over others. Instead, he tells us to love our neighbors and even our enemies (Matthew 5:43-48). The Book of Acts shows the early Christians winning conversions through persuasion, not coercion or manipulation. Sadly, some later Christians who held the reigns of political power did enforce Christian conformity through the sword. One would be hard pressed, though, to find any warrant for this in the teachings of Jesus (or the Apostles).

Douglas Groothuis, from On Jesus, p. 46

Religious faith seldom causes war…

I had barely begun separating the teetering stacks of books dedicated to ancient and medieval warfare when Charles Phillips and Alan Axelrod fortuitously happened to publish their three-volume Encyclopedia of Wars, a massive 1,502-page compendium compiled by nine reputable professors of history, including the director of the Centre of Military History and the former head of the Centre of Defence Studies, of what amounts to a significant percentage of all the wars that have taken place throughout recorded human history. Continue reading

It is one thing to recognize bias…

It is one thing to recognize bias and aim off for it: it is quite another to suppose that because men passionately believe something to be true it must therefore be false.

Michael Green, from The Truth of God Incarnate, p. 120

People who are not neutral…

It is not fair … to assume someone has distorted the facts simply because he has a stake in the matter. People who are not neutral can still be fair and impartial. Instead, you have to show that they have faltered by looking carefully at the evidence itself.

Greg Koukl, from Tactics, kindle location 2659

If writing with a goal implies propaganda…

If writing with a goalwhether it be evangelistic, apologetic, or didacticimplies propaganda, then all recorded history is propaganda … a work shouldn’t be dismissed simply because of the strong convictions of the writer. Should we discount the facticity or reliability of the accounts of Nazi concentration camp survivors simply because they passionately recount their story?

Paul Copan, from True For You, But Not For Me, p. 101