Primarily because it is true…

For those of us who seek to be followers of Jesus Christ, the central demand of the New Testament should dominate our lives—the worldwide proclamation of the gospel. That gospel tells us that Jesus of Nazareth was the incarnate Son of God who died on the cross to atone for the sins of the world and rose bodily from the dead. This message is to be presented to people primarily because it is true and not because it works, though the practical benefits of knowing Christ are certainly important. If we follow the New Testament example, we are to present the gospel as a rational message to be believed and we are to defend it against objections.

J. P. Moreland, from Scaling the Secular City, p. 249

This is truly good news…

Two thousand years ago a man lived in what is today the country of Israel. He was a Jew and a carpenter by trade. He never traveled far from home, never wrote a book, never raised an army, and never served in any political office. But amazingly, incredibly, he claimed to be the Messiah and Son of God. He lived a perfect life and performed miracles, healing the sick and lame, giving sight to the blind, walking on water, even raising the dead, the kinds of things one would expect the real Son of God would be able to do. Continue reading

The doctrine of the Trinity is deeply mysterious…

I believe, with almost everyone else who has ever thought about the matter, that the doctrine of the Trinity is deeply mysterious. And that seems fully appropriate, since this doctrine concerns the metaphysics of the nature of God and it would be hubris of the highest degree for us to suppose our minds were capable of understanding the divine essence. The point in our offering this model is to indicate that good sense can be made of the notion of God as “three in one.”

Thomas Senor, from Reason for the Hope Within, p. 257

Making miracles a live option…

A miracle’s probability greatly increases if “God’s existence” is part of the relevant background information, making miracles a live option. We shouldn’t decide in advance that miracles are impossible, particularly if (a) God exists and creates and has revealed himself in history, and, given this context, (b) there is good historical evidence to support such a miracle-claim.

Paul Copan, from Loving Wisdom, kindle location 1701

Credibility to a miraculous claim…

To reject the historicity of the Gospels a priori because they contain miracles violates logical and historical standards of reasoning. Since the Gospels are well established historically, the miracle stories they convey deserve serious historical consideration. The only way to know whether there is credibility to a miraculous claim is to investigate it. The cutting edge of science exploration has revealed a universe in which miracles are possible. To reject miracles based on a precommitment to the naturalistic worldview is to engage in circular reasoning.

Kenneth Richard Samples, from Without a Doubt, kindle location 1091

Where miracles are in question…

No doubt, the historian will be more exacting in his examination of the evidence where miracles are in question. But if the evidence is really good, he will not refuse it on a priori grounds.

F. F. Bruce, from The New Testament Documents: Are They Reliable?, p. 62