It is the Scriptures which are inspired…

Inspiration certainly includes the man and his ideas, but it must not exclude his writings. James Orr believes that “inspiration belongs primarily to the person and to the book only as it is the product of the inspired person.”

Other theologians would reverse that opinion, asserting, “Properly speaking, inspiration pertains to the holy Scriptures themselves. It may be said, however, that the writers too were inspired by God.” Regardless of which position is primary, it must be held that the person as well as his pen is under the direction of the Holy Spirit in the total process of inspiration. Nevertheless, the New Testament reserves the word “inspiration” only for the product of that process, that is, the writings, or graphe (2 Tim. 3:16). Continue reading

The Spirit’s inspiring activity…

We are to think of the Spirit’s inspiring activity, and, for that matter, of all His regular operations in and upon human personality, as (to use an old but valuable technical term) concursive; that is, as exercised in, through and by means of the writers’ own activity, in such a way that their thinking and writing was both free and spontaneous on their part and divinely elicited and controlled, and what they wrote was not only their own work but also God’s work.

J. I. Packer, quoted in A General Introduction to the Bible by Norman Geisler, p. 38

God’s work of inspiration…

God’s work of inspiration meant using the human authors “in research (Luke 1:1-4), permitting them to express intense feeling (Romans 9:1-3), transmitting direct revelation (Deuteronomy 9:10), giving authoritative commands (1 Corinthians 7:10), expressing opinions (1 Corinthians 7:40), but always guided and guarded by the Holy Spirit (2 Peter 1:21) so that the product can be said to have been breathed out by God (2 Timothy 3:16).”

Charles Ryrie, quoted in Reasoning from the Scriptures with Catholics by Ron Rhodes, p. 54

The original documents of the Bible…

The original documents of the Bible were written by men, who, though permitted to exercise their own personalities and literary talents, yet wrote under the control and guidance of the Spirit of God, the result being in every word of the original documents a perfect and errorless recording of the exact message which God desired to give to man.

Benjamin Warfield, quoted in Reasoning from the Scriptures with Catholics by Ron Rhodes, p. 53