The gospel is never heard in isolation…

A robust natural theology may well be necessary for the gospel to be effectively heard in Western society today….

Properly understanding our culture is important because the gospel is never heard in isolation. It is always heard against the background of the current cultural milieu. A person raised in a cultural milieu in which Christianity is still seen as an intellectually viable option will display an openness to the gospel. But you may as well tell the secularist to believe in fairies or leprechauns as in Jesus Christ!…

It is the broader task of Christian apologetics, including natural theology, to help create and sustain a cultural milieu in which the gospel can be heard as an intellectually viable option for thinking men and women. It thereby gives people the intellectual permission to believe when their hearts are moved.

William Lane Craig, from God Is Not Dead Yet, http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2008/july/13.22.html

Natural theology asserts that people…

Natural theology which is derived from general (natural) revelation, stands as a polar opposite to fideism in matters of philosophy and theology. Where natural theology asserts that people can and do gain valid knowledge of God by means of natural reason reflecting upon natural revelation, fideism asserts that God can be known only by faith. Fideism as an ism does not merely assert that faith is crucial to Christianity. The ism of fideism negates a knowledge of God via natural theology. It denies man’s ability to know God except by faith.

R. C. Sproul, from Classical Apologetics, p. 27

A book that touches on the cosmos…

God gave us religious truths in a book of history and a book that touches on the cosmos as well. What sense does it make for God to give us religious truths and at the same time place them in a book that is wrong when it touches history and the cosmos?

Francis Schaeffer, quoted in Know Why You Believe by Paul Little, p.125

The pattern of natural theology…

The way to think about the pattern of natural theology is not in terms of “proof” for the existence of God but in terms of inference to the reality of God as the best explanation of a wide and diverse range of phenomena, including the origin of the universe, the innumerable instances of design in the universe, the presence of finite persons in the universe and their spiritual nature, the human capacity for language and self-determination, and so on.

Douglas Geivett, from Jesus Under Fire, by J. P. Moreland, p. 188