Religious claims conflict so radically…

Religious claims conflict so radically that they cannot all be true. For instance, the Christian doctrine that Jesus is God incarnate is blasphemous to the Muslim, and to accept this doctrine is to commit the sin of shirk—ascribing partners to Allah. Or take the historicity of Jesus’ resurrection as foundational for Christianity. The Hindu would stress that it doesn’t matter whether Jesus rose or not; his teachings still ring true. In these two cases, while both positions may be wrong, both cannot be right. If, as relativism maintains, both A and its opposite non-A are true, then what is false? Such talk negates any logic and reasoning. If someone’s “truth” is the opposite of another’s, then both simply cannot be true.

Paul Copan, from “True For You, But Not For Me”, p. 30

The world’s religions disagree about…

The world’s religions do not support the claim that there are many paths up the same mountain. The paths are utterly inimical to one another on almost every important issue. In fact, the world’s religions disagree about the existence and nature of the mountain itself and contradict one another on all of the topics of greatest importance. One simply must investigate those claims to determine which religions can withstand rigorous scrutiny of their claims. Nothing less than eternity may be at stake.

Craig Parton, from Religion on Trial, p. 94

Major religions are radically different…

Careful examination of the basic tenets of the various religious traditions demonstrates that, far from teaching the same thing, the major religions have radically different perspectives on the religious ultimate.

Harold Netland, quoted in Without a Doubt by Kenneth Richard Samples, kindle location 1820

All religions teach the same things…

It is ridiculous to say that all religions teach the same things when they disagree at the fundamental point as to what God is like. The gods of the East are infinite by definition—the definition being ‘god is all that is.’ This is the pan-everything-ism god. The gods of the West have tended to be personal but limited; such were the gods of the Greeks, Romans and Germans. But the God of the Bible, Old and New Testaments alike, is the infinite-personal God.

Francis Schaeffer, from The God Who Is There, p. 94