Undoubting about the truth…

What we suffer from today, wrote Chesterton in the previous century, “is humility in the wrong place. Modesty has moved from the organ of ambition … [and] settled upon the organ of conviction, where it was never meant to be. A man was meant to be doubtful about himself, but undoubting about the truth; this has been exactly reversed. We are on the road to producing a race of men too mentally modest to believe in the multiplication table.”

Kevin DeYoung, from Why We’re Not Emergent, p. 40

There is a law above the law…

I don’t know if you recall, but at the end of World War II there were the Nuremberg trials where they tried the German war criminals. The Nazi war criminals, to their defense, advanced a version of moral relativism [that is] called legal positivism [which] is roughly the idea that there is nothing that is really right or wrong—that right or wrong is solely what people believe in a culture. The war criminals said: Continue reading

This is the first law of relativism…

This is the first law of relativism: when right or wrong are a matter of personal choice, we surrender the privilege of making moral judgments on others’ actions. But if our moral intuition rebels against these consequences of relativism—if we’re sure that some things must be wrong and that some judgments against another’s conduct are justified—then relativism is false.

Greg Koukl and Francis Beckwith, from Relativism: Feet Firmly Planted in Mid-air, p. 63

A relativist’s natural response when evil…

A belief is a propensity to act as if a thing were true. Our actions—and, in some cases, our reactions—are a guide to our true beliefs. A relativist’s natural response when evil strikes close to home will usually betray her. She says she rejects morality, but in reality she still believes in it. Her actions tell the true story.

Greg Koukl and Francis Beckwith, from Relativism: Feet Firmly Planted in Mid-Air, p. 147