They don’t need God to have morality…

Some attempt to argue that they don’t need God to have morality. They can live a moral life even though they don’t believe in a divine being. But no one argues that an atheist can’t behave in a way one might call moral. The real question is, Why ought he? Trappist monk Thomas Merton put it this way: “In the name of whom or what do you ask me to behave? Why should I go to the inconvenience of denying myself the satisfactions I desire in the name of some standard that exists only in your imagination? Why should I worship the fictions that you have imposed on me in the name of nothing?”

Greg Koukl and Francis Beckwith, from Relativism: Feet Firmly Planted in Mid-air, p. 169

Why think humans have rights…

Why think humans have rights and dignity if they’re products of valueless, physical processes in a cause-and-effect series from the Big Bang until now? The more plausible scenario is that human value and moral responsibility come from a good God who created us as intrinsically valuable, morally responsible creatures. We function properly when living morally. We glimpse something of a personal God in the world’s moral order: without a personal God, no persons would exist at all. If no persons would exist, then no moral properties would be realized in our world.

Paul Copan, from Loving Wisdom, kindle location 1304

A decently functioning conscience…

If we have a decently functioning conscience, we can recognize that Jesus or Mother Teresa is morally superior to Hitler—and that basic moral values aren’t invented but discovered.

Paul Copan, from Loving Wisdom, kindle location 1293