The most reliable knowledge of God available…

The incarnation makes God tangible. It helps us think about God. It is quite astonishing how the question, ‘Is Christ divine?’ is discussed as if we had an excellent idea about what God was like, while Christ himself remained something of an enigma. But exactly the opposite is so obviously the case! Christ confronts us through the gospel narratives and through experience, whereas we have no clear vision of God. As John’s gospel reminds us: ‘No one has ever seen God; the only Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, has made him known’ (John 1:18). God is Christlike—in other words, we learn to think of God as we see him in Christ. For the Christian, it is Christ who provides us with the basis of the most reliable knowledge of God available.

Alister McGrath, from Understanding Jesus, p. 109

Jesus acts as God and for God…

We are thus in a position to take the crucial step which underlies all Christian thinking on the incarnation—that, as Jesus acts as God and for God in every context of importance, we should conclude that, for all intents and purposes, Jesus is God.

Alister McGrath, from Understanding Jesus, p. 96

The great mercy and marvel of the Incarnation…

Thanks to the great mercy and marvel of the Incarnation, the cosmic scene is resolved into a human drama. God reaches down to relate himself to man, and man reaches up to relate himself to God. Time looks into eternity and eternity into time, making now always and always now. Everything is transformed by this sublime drama of the Incarnation, God’s special parable for fallen man in a fallen world. The way opens before us that was charted in the birth, ministry, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ, a way that successive generations of believers have striven to follow. They have derived there from the moral, spiritual, and intellectual creativity out of which has come everything truly great in our art, our literature, our music. From that source comes the splendour of the great cathedrals and the illumination of the saints and mystics, as well as countless lives of dedication, men and women serving their God and loving their Saviour in humility and faith.

Malcolm Muggeridge, from The End of Christendom, p. 51

The Maker of man became man…

The Maker of man became man that He, Ruler of the stars, might be nourished at the breast; that He, the Bread, might be hungry; that He, the Fountain, might thirst; that He, the Light, might sleep; that He, the Way, might be wearied by the journey; that He, the Truth, might be accused by false witnesses; that He, the Judge of the living and the dead, might be brought to trial by a mortal judge; that He, Justice, might be condemned by the unjust; that He, Discipline, might be scourged with whips; that He, the Foundation, might be suspended upon a cross; that Courage might be weakened; that Security might be wounded; that Life might die. Continue reading

When all things began, the Word…

When all things began, the Word already was. The Word dwelt with God, and what God was, the Word was. So the Word became flesh; he came to dwell among us, and we saw his glory, such glory as befits the Father’s only Son, full of grace and truth.

John 1:1, 14, The Holy Bible, Revised English Bible