Love compelled is a precursor to loneliness…

The skeptic asks why God could not have made us to always choose good. Philosophers of note have raised this as the sharpest edge of their challenge to Christianity. But here, too, the challenge violates reason.

Alvin Plantinga of the University of Notre Dame, who is considered by many to be the most respected Protestant philosopher of our time, has made a strong and compelling argument against this challenge of the skeptic. He argues that this option bears a false view of what God’s omnipotence means. We must realize that God cannot do that which is mutually exclusive and logically impossible. God cannot make square circles. The terms are mutually exclusive. Continue reading

The solution to the problem of evil…

Here is the Story’s solution to the problem of evil: perfect justice for evildoers, perfect mercy for the penitent; evil banished forever, and everlasting good restored.

Greg Koukl, from The Story of Reality, kindle location 2555

Jesus is man’s only hope…

Jesus, the God-man, is man’s only hope because only Jesus can fix the problem of evil. Only God coming down into the world can rescue the world from itself.

Greg Koukl, from The Story of Reality, kindle location 2366

Understanding the problem of evil…

Here is the key to understanding the problem of evil: When God’s children disobeyed their heavenly Father, they damaged everything. When Adam and Eve rebelled against the King of the universe, they broke the whole world.

Greg Koukl, from The Story of Reality, kindle location 1431

Evil is not the problem for Christianity…

Evil is not the problem for Christianity that people think it is because it is not foreign to the Story. It is central to it. It fits right in. In a certain sense, the entire Story is precisely about how the world went bad and how it gets fixed.

Greg Koukl, from The Story of Reality, kindle location 488

Every worldview must give an explanation…

At the outset, let us remember that every worldview—not just Christianity’s—must give an explanation or an answer for evil and suffering. Either evil categorically proves that God does not exist, as the atheist avows, or evil is “not ultimately real evil,” as the pantheist claims, or evil is most coherently explained by the Christian view of God and His purpose in creation. In short, this is not a problem distinctive to Christianity. It will not due for the challenger just to raise the question. This problem of evil is one to which we all must offer an answer, regardless of the belief system to which we subscribe.

Ravi Zacharias, from Jesus Among Other Gods, p. 108

My argument against God collapsed…

My argument against God was that the universe seemed so cruel and unjust. But how had I got this idea of just and unjust? A man does not call a line crooked unless he has some idea of a straight line. What was I comparing this universe with when I called it unjust? Of course I could have given up my idea of justice by saying it was nothing but a private idea of my own. But if I did that, then my argument against God collapsed too…

C. S. Lewis, quoted in False Gods of Our Time by Norman Geisler, p. 59

Why think humans really are evil?..

While many may wonder how a morally respectable God could allow human beings to get this bad, the more basic question is: Without the context of God as a standard of goodness and humans are morally accountable to him, why think humans really are evil? Aren’t they just abnormal maladjusted, dysfunctional, statistically deviant, or highly individualistic? Therapeutic or psychoanalytic categories are simply insufficient to account for the deep evils that exist. Various Eastern views are similarly inept. For example, Arthur Koestler tells of one Zen Buddhist scholar calling Hitler’s gas chambers “very silly,” claiming that evil is “relative” and merely “a Christian concept.” The very clear existence of evil, we’ve noted, suggests a standard of goodness or design plan: evil is a deviation from or corruption of this standard and a departure from what ought to be. To say that the actions of Hitler, Stalin, Pol Pot, Mao Tse Tung, or even the Columbine killers were simply “abnormal” or “maladjusted,” not evil, is not only hollow, but grotesquely distorted.

Paul Copan, from Loving Wisdom, kindle location 2039