When Nietzsche said “God is dead…

When Nietzsche said “God is dead,” he didn’t mean the Supreme Being had died. When Nietzsche said “God is dead,” what he meant was that the power centers of Western culture had turned secular. When he said “God is dead,” he meant religion was no longer relevant to the political world or to the educational systems of Europe.

J. P. Moreland, from Assessing the Crisis of Our Age Part 1 at 30:52

If we demand He leave us alone…

I believe God is deeply saddened by this (9/11/01), just as we are, but for years we’ve been telling God to get out of our schools, to get out of our government and to get out of our lives. How can we expect God to give us His blessing and His protection if we demand He leave us alone?

Ann Graham Lotz

The social structure is tumbling down…

Previous civilizations have been overthrown from without by the incursion of barbarian hordes. Christendom has dreamed up its own dissolution in the minds of its own intellectual elite. Our barbarians are home products, indoctrinated at the public expense, urged on by the media systematically stage by stage, dismantling Christendom, depreciating and deprecating all its values. The whole social structure is now tumbling down, dethroning its God, undermining all its certainties. All this, wonderfully enough, is being done in the name of the health, wealth, and happiness of all mankind.

Malcolm Muggeridge, from The End of Christendom, p. 17

The secular revolution affected every…

This “secular revolution” affected every part of American culture—not only higher education but also the public schools, politics, psychology, and the media. In each of these areas, Christianity was privatized as “sectarian,” while secular philosophies like materialism and naturalism were put forth as “objective” and “neutral,” and therefore the only perspectives suitable for the public sphere. Continue reading