A bias against theology…

Popular evangelical faith has developed a bias against theology (not to mention against the intellect), and what is more, it has elevated the bias to the level of a virtue, defending it as vigorously as democracy.

David F. Wells

Their overall effect was negative…

While many results of these movements (“great” awakenings) were positive, their overall effect was negative to Christianity in America. For example, the movements emphasized immediate personal conversion to Christ instead of a studied period of reflection and conviction before conversion. Emotionally charged, simple messages—rather than intellectually careful and doctrinally precise sermons—became the norm. Personal feelings, along with an emphasis on a right relationship with Christ, became the most important feature of conversion. This was in place of a deep grasp of the nature of Christian teaching and ideas.

J. P. Moreland and Mark Matlock, from Smart Faith, p. 20

The lack of a Christian mind…

Harry Blamires has justly deplored the contemporary lack of a Christian mind. A “Christian mind” is described by Mr. Blamires as “a mind trained, informed, equipped to handle data of secular controversy within a framework of reference which is constructed of Christian presuppositions,” presuppositions (for example) of the supernatural, of the pervasiveness of evil, of truth, authority and the value of the human person. Continue reading