Listen carefully to what they say…

Note that learning to read the audience, learning to understand those to whom you are witnessing, is vital. Listen carefully to what they say, ask lots of questions, don’t jump in with irrelevant comments or statements that are not sensitive to what you are learning about them. These are not easy tasks, and they will not guarantee success, but they will make it far more likely.

James Sire, from Why Good Arguments Often Fail, p. 91

Creativity in defending the faith…

One thing we always know, most effective apologetics will need to combine reason and rhetoric in an imaginative way. There is always room for creativity in defending the faith.

James Sire, from Why Good Arguments Often Fail, p. 145

Not because ”we say so”…

The Christian does not ask the skeptic to naively accept what the Bible says because ”we say so,” but only to be open-minded enough to read a Gospel and ask questions of it, scrutinize it, and see for themselves whether what they find is compelling and truthful or not.

Amy Orr-Ewing, from Just Thinking, the triannual communique of Ravi Zacharias International Ministries, Winter 2005

The defense of the faith should be…

The defense of the faith should be of a scholarly kind. Mere denunciation does not constitute an argument; and before a man can refute successfully an argument of an opponent he must understand the argument that he is endeavoring to refute. Personalities, in such debate, should be kept in the background; and analysis of the motives of one’s opponents has little place.

J. Gresham Machen, quoted in The New Mormon Challenge, Francis Beckwith