Man differs from Earth’s other creatures…

Man’s distinguishing characteristic is that he bears the image of God. This natural image illustrates six distinct ways in which man differs from Earth’s other creatures. Human beings possess spiritual, personal, self-conscious, and rational components. Similar to God they are volitional, relational, immortal, and powerful—unlike any other creatures.

Kenneth Richard Samples, from A World of Difference, kindle location 1941

Humans do have a value transcending that of animals…

One consequence of [Carl] Sagan’s religion of the cosmos was that he was actively committed to the cause of animal rights. And quite logically so. For if humans evolved from beasts, there can be no intrinsic difference between them. It would be just as cruel and immoral to kill a cow as to murder a person. “In my writings,” Sagan said in a Parade magazine article, “I have tried to show how closely related we are to other animals, how cruel it is to gratuitously inflict pain on them.” As a result, he was adamantly opposed to using animals for medical research. For if animals have the same value as humans, how can we justify expending their lives to save humans. Continue reading

Nature made animals for the sake of man…

Plants exist for [the sake of animals] and the other animals for the sake of man … nature has made all the animals for the sake of man.

Aristotle, quoted in Six Modern Myths About Christianity & Western Civilization by Philip Sampson, p. 73

Humans are distinct from animals…

having been made in God’s image, humans are markedly distinct from animals. As we’ve briefly noted, animals do have souls that animate and direct their bodies; in Genesis 1:24, 2:19, and elsewhere, animals are also called living creatures/beings (nephesh); still, their soulish capacities are diminished where it really counts: they don’t have intrinsic dignity, the capacity to relate to God, to make free choices (they simply act according to instinct and environment), to be morally responsible agents, to think self-consciously (thinking about their own thinking), to pursue truth rather than just survive.

Paul Copan, from Loving Wisdom, kindle location 2512

Nature made the animals for man…

The doctrine that “nature made the animals for man to do with as he wishes” is Greek, not biblical, and was more prominent in the language of the Enlightenment than in that of the Reformation.

Philip Sampson, from Six Modern Myths About Christianity & Western Civilization, p. 90