The whole point of Christianity…

It is worth noting that the whole point of Christianity lies not in interference with the human power to choose, but in producing a willing consent to choose good rather than evil.

J. B. Phillips, quoted in The God Conversation by J. P. Moreland and Tim Muehlhoff, p. 27

The actions of wolves who wear wool…

Certainly organizations calling themselves ‘Christian’ have often had deleterious and even disastrous effects on human society. But such movements have clearly diverged at least as far from the gospel of Christ as they have from the restraints of common morality. Sheep ought not to be judged by the actions of wolves who wear wool.

Thomas Morris, quoted in Without a Doubt by Kenneth Richard Samples, kindle location 2363

Violence done in the name of Christ…

Since oppression and mayhem are neither religious duties for Christians nor logical applications of the teachings of Christ, violence done in the name of Christ cannot be laid at his door. This conduct might tell you something about people. It tells you nothing about God or the gospel.

Greg Koukl, from Tactics, kindle location 2702

In this world I am a stranger…

As for myself, I can’t say, it would be impossible for me to say, that at that point I believed or that at that point I disbelieved. I just struggled along feeling from the beginning convinced of one thing, which I think perhaps is the basic nature of a religious faith, that in this world I am a stranger. I don’t belong here. I am staying here for a bit and it’s a very nice place, an interesting place, but I don’t belong here.

Malcolm Muggeridge, from The End of Christendom, p. 28

He is not ready to become a Christian…

We are talking about real truth, and not something vaguely religious which seems to work psychologically…. We are talking about real guilt before God…. We are talking … about real history, that the death of Jesus was not just an ideal or a symbol, but a fact of space and time…. Until he understands the importance of these three things, he is not ready to become a Christian.

Francis Schaeffer, quoted in Ambassador’s Guide to Postmodernism by Greg Koukl, p. 58