There is a law in the universe…

The Christian answer begins by saying that man is a moral creature made in the image of the Creator; that there is a law in the universe which, if broken, means that man is culpable. In this view, man is morally significant both as far as God is concerned and as far as his fellow men are concerned.

Francis Schaeffer, from The God Who Is There, p. 105

The final measure of mankind’s humanity…

Cultures can be judged in many ways, but eventually every nation in every age must be judged by this test: how did it treat people? Each generation, each wave of humanity, evaluates its predecessors on this basis. The final measure of mankind’s humanity is how humanely people treat one another.

Francis Schaeffer, quoted in Great Divides by Ronald Nash, p. 19

Good and evil do not exist…

In a world without God, there can be no objective right and wrong, only our culturally and personally relative, subjective judgments. This means that it is impossible to condemn war, oppression, or crime as evil. Nor can one praise brotherhood, equality, and love as good. For in a universe without God, good and evil do not exist—there is only the bare valueless fact of existence, and there is no one to say you are right and I am wrong.

William Lane Craig

Primarily because it is true…

For those of us who seek to be followers of Jesus Christ, the central demand of the New Testament should dominate our lives—the worldwide proclamation of the gospel. That gospel tells us that Jesus of Nazareth was the incarnate Son of God who died on the cross to atone for the sins of the world and rose bodily from the dead. This message is to be presented to people primarily because it is true and not because it works, though the practical benefits of knowing Christ are certainly important. If we follow the New Testament example, we are to present the gospel as a rational message to be believed and we are to defend it against objections.

J. P. Moreland, from Scaling the Secular City, p. 249

This is truly good news…

Two thousand years ago a man lived in what is today the country of Israel. He was a Jew and a carpenter by trade. He never traveled far from home, never wrote a book, never raised an army, and never served in any political office. But amazingly, incredibly, he claimed to be the Messiah and Son of God. He lived a perfect life and performed miracles, healing the sick and lame, giving sight to the blind, walking on water, even raising the dead, the kinds of things one would expect the real Son of God would be able to do. Continue reading

The doctrine of the Trinity is deeply mysterious…

I believe, with almost everyone else who has ever thought about the matter, that the doctrine of the Trinity is deeply mysterious. And that seems fully appropriate, since this doctrine concerns the metaphysics of the nature of God and it would be hubris of the highest degree for us to suppose our minds were capable of understanding the divine essence. The point in our offering this model is to indicate that good sense can be made of the notion of God as “three in one.”

Thomas Senor, from Reason for the Hope Within, p. 257